IYL 2015 Images

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    Milky Way/Light Pollution Hawaii, USA

    Behind the glow of an active volcano, the beautiful starry skies can be seen from a dark site in Hawaii. Without the lights from human development, thousands of individual stars as well as the Milky Way galaxy can be seen. Unfortunately, light pollution from poorly designed and inefficient lighting is taking away this wonderful cosmic view from most people. In fact, light pollution is so common only a handful of the very brightest stars can be seen from the ground in most urban and suburban environments.
    Image Credit: Rogelio Bernal Andreo/DeepSkyColors.com/Ciel et Espace
    view and download image here. http://lightexhibit.org/photoindex.html

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    Comet Hale-Bopp Long Island Sound

    Comet Hale-Bopp was one of the brightest comets in decades, reaching its closest approach to Earth in 1997. It could be seen across the Northern Hemisphere, and it was visible without a telescope or binoculars for about 18 months. The white tail is due to sunlight reflecting off dust from the comet, and traces the motion of the comet. The blue tail shines as gas from the comet, primarily carbon monoxide, interacts with particles flowing away from by the Sun, and traces the direction of this flow. Here, Comet Hale-Bopp is captured as it appears over the waters of Long Island Sound in New York.
    Image Credit: Donald Lubowich
    view and download image here. http://lightexhibit.org/photoindex.html

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    The Milky Way Hawaii, US

    The Milky Way is our home galaxy. It contains billions of stars, of which our Sun is just one. The Milky Way is shaped like a large disk, with a bulge at the middle that contains a giant black hole. Our Sun, and the planets that orbit it including Earth, are about two-thirds away from the center of this galactic disk. From this vantage point, the combined light from the multitude of other stars in our Galaxy produce a milky path, which may be how the name originated. The dark patches are due to interstellar dust that obscures the view to the center of the Galaxy in visible light, making it necessary to use telescopes sensitive to other wavelengths to study the Galactic center. The Milky Way is just one of billions of known galaxies, each containing their own multitude of pinpricks of starlight.
    Image Credit: Rogelio Bernal Andreo/DeepSkyColors.com/Ciel et Espace
    view and download image here. http://lightexhibit.org/photoindex.html

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    Tatio Geysers, Andes Mountains, Chile


    Image Credit: 2014 © J.M. Lecleire/PNA
    view and download image here. http://lightexhibit.org/photoindex.html

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    Milky Way Over Baobabs, Morondava, Madagascar

    As a so-called spiral galaxy, our Milky Way galaxy contains majestic arms of stars, dust, and gas that emanate from a central bulge area. Our Solar System resides in one of the outer arms of the Milky Way. When we look toward the center of the Milky Way, as we do in this photograph, we see a swath of starlight across the sky. This, however, is only a small percentage of the total stars there, as the dust and gas block much of our view in visible light.
    Image Credit: 2014 © Mohammad Taha Ghouchkanlu/PNA
    view and download image here. http://lightexhibit.org/photoindex.html